The Ayurvedic Guide to Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD)

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a condition that affects blood vessels outside the brain and heart. The most common cause of this disease is the accumulation of fatty deposits in the arteries.

This is a common circulatory issue in which narrowed arteries reduce blood flow to the limbs. As a result, the legs don't get sufficient blood to keep up the movement. While walking, patients experience leg pain that goes away on its own when they rest.

What is Peripheral Arterial Disease?

Peripheral artery disease is similar to coronary artery disease, except that it occurs in the arteries of the body's peripheral parts, such as the legs, and hands.

Peripheral vascular disease is another name for it. It usually doesn't cause any symptoms, but it can cause nonspecific ones like walking pain or rashes that go away with a little rest. These peculiarities are called intermittent claudication or constriction.

Uttana vatarakta is the Ayurvedic term for peripheral blood vessel disease. Blockages (avarana) occur when the Kapha and Pitta doshas accumulate in the blood channels, or marga. Vatarakta and its complications result from this effect on circulating vata, known as vegapratibadha. Vatarakta is a disease that affects both Vata and Rakta.

Improper diet and lifestyle aggravate the tridoshas (dominated by Vata) by causing Aam (toxins) to form. This vitiates the blood and makes it thick and heavy in nature due to Aam and kapha, and the vessels become narrow due to the vata vitiation, which reduces the elasticity of the vessel, and kapha and Aam, which settle in the vessels and form cholesterol. With time, there is pressure on the heart to pump blood through these narrow vessels around the body. This results in stiffening or hardening of the artery walls.

The Ayurvedic Guide to Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD)

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a condition that affects blood vessels outside the brain and heart. The most common cause of this disease is the accumulation of fatty deposits in the arteries.

This is a common circulatory issue in which narrowed arteries reduce blood flow to the limbs. As a result, the legs don't get sufficient blood to keep up the movement. While walking, patients experience leg pain that goes away on its own when they rest.

What is Peripheral Arterial Disease?

Peripheral artery disease is similar to coronary artery disease, except that it occurs in the arteries of the body's peripheral parts, such as the legs, and hands.

Peripheral vascular disease is another name for it. It usually doesn't cause any symptoms, but it can cause nonspecific ones like walking pain or rashes that go away with a little rest. These peculiarities are called intermittent claudication or constriction.

Uttana vatarakta is the Ayurvedic term for peripheral blood vessel disease. Blockages (avarana) occur when the Kapha and Pitta doshas accumulate in the blood channels, or marga. Vatarakta and its complications result from this effect on circulating vata, known as vegapratibadha. Vatarakta is a disease that affects both Vata and Rakta.

Improper diet and lifestyle aggravate the tridoshas (dominated by Vata) by causing Aam (toxins) to form. This vitiates the blood and makes it thick and heavy in nature due to Aam and kapha, and the vessels become narrow due to the vata vitiation, which reduces the elasticity of the vessel, and kapha and Aam, which settle in the vessels and form cholesterol. With time, there is pressure on the heart to pump blood through these narrow vessels around the body. This results in stiffening or hardening of the artery walls.